Local Heroes at Edinburgh Airport

In August 2016 Local Heroes presented a major exhibition of newly commissioned Scottish design souvenirs at Edinburgh Airport. A key part of Scotland’s Year of Innovation, Architecture and Design, Local Heroes presented contemporary design to a global audience spanning 120 different locations and three continents. Our exhibition was seen by over 0.5 million people and covered extensively by national and international press including Vogue, The Skinny, BBC, We Heart, Design Week, The Future Laboratory, and The List.

We commissioned some of Scotland’s most interesting and successful designers to create exclusive products for Local Heroes 2016 which you can view below along with films about each designer. This work collectively represents a striking period of contemporary design in Scotland characterised by a renewed confidence and optimism. Local Heroes leaves behind stereotypes about the Scottish design aesthetic and emphasises the modern approach of contemporary designers who embrace bright colour, dynamic pattern and innovative techniques and materials.

The exhibition and shop featured designers based in Scotland whose work exemplifies outstanding quality, originality and design thinking. A special public programme of design events was produced in partnership with Creative Dundee and Creative Edinburgh.

Karen Mabon

Rain Dance

For Local Heroes, Karen Mabon has designed an umbrella and sunshade illustrated with distinctive hand-drawn dancers on each panel which employs a summery, sorbet inspired colour palette. The slim, classic umbrella is a completely new product for Karen, who is known around the world primarily for her silk and cashmere scarves.

Karen says, “I like that as an umbrella and a sunshade it’s a tongue-in-cheek nod to the changeable Scottish weather. I love any kind of project that trusts your skill as a designer to add things to the world. To design an object under the brief of a souvenir is liberating and that’s really good for generating new ideas. It’s flattering, and to do good work you need confidence.”

Karen Mabon - Rain Dance | Photo: Stuart McClay
Photo: Stuart McClay

On the subject of developing new products Karen says “learning about a new set of problems and choices about function and colour and materials — that’s the best part.” Karen experimented with a denser pattern at first and finally decided on a design that was easy to spot in a crowd. “If something makes you smile every time you look at it then that is really nice.”

Whimsical maximalism is what Karen Mabon is known for, “I’m inspired by Disneyland and experiences that I feel are really far-fetched – like the photographer Taryn Simon who takes photographs of confiscated fruit and veg on the Mexico border – things that are on the edge of your imagination. I’m interested in the point at which something stop being a fantasy: like films that are styled as though they are documentaries.”

Karen Mabon | Photo: Future Positive Studio
Photo: Future Positive Studio

Karen says Scotland’s environment dictates in a way that it doesn’t in London. “We are so aware of the weather and that influences materials and other aspects of being a Scottish designer, we hold certain values close, like wanting value for money – wanting things to last.”

Scotland’s relative geographic isolation is seen by the designer as a positive. She feels that Scotland’s cities are small enough for smaller movements to rise easily. “I’ve had the experience of being a designer in London where the mass criticism was difficult – everyone gives their opinions so freely whereas in Scotland you can do things with less budget or that are more lo-fi and people appreciate the idea. People can experiment with things that aren’t perfect or resolved.”

Karen Mabon | Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Photo: Future Positive Studio

“I wonder if it’s partly because of the internet and the freedom of being based here, but being able to ship my scarves everywhere… you feel like you’re winning you know? Getting to live here and enjoy the quality of life.”

Her bookshelf is punctuated by an eclectic selection of large format art and design publications such as Sweet Dreams: Contemporary Indian Studio Photographs; Celia Birtwell; Liberty of London; Anna Pugh and Yokoo by Yokoos. “I tend to read a lot online and I think it’s interesting that with Pinterest and Instagram you’re always scrolling and used to seeing everything in a collaged way. As a designer you’re aware your product isn’t necessarily viewed in isolation.”

Karen Mabon | Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍‍Photo: Future Positive Studio

Her scarves often feature places that are populated by imaginary characters and look like strange landscapes. “I design them ‘flat’ and then they become another thing when they are tied and then untied. My work is about nostalgia and the comfort of colours and animals from childhood and symbols like those found in comic books. Semiology is interesting and I like to make work that’s accessible. Environments like pound shops and museums are places that I like.”

Hilary Grant

Archipelago

For Local Heroes, Hilary Grant have designed a lambswool travel blanket inspired by rhythm, mirroring and colour theory and the knitting traditions of Scotland and its neighbouring Nordic countries. The blankets are intended to help travellers stay warm during flights, boat crossings and other adventures.

The travel blanket commissioned by Local Heroes explores new techniques and has been designed and produced at a finer gauge to that of previous Hilary Grant designs. “This allowed us the freedom to have a higher number of stitches per square inch – similar to the idea of high resolution digital images. So we’ve been able to do a lot more in a smaller space.”

Hilary Grant | ‍Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Photo: Future Positive Studio

For Archipelago the designers worked with the idea of dual scale – “intricate pattern close up, but at a distance creating big graphical gestures.” says Grant. “We wanted to really play with this technique for Local Heroes, with the fading triangular shape created from a gradient of pattern densities. We looked at world flags and nautical flags to inform colour proportion.”

The yarn used is a fine lambswool, dyed and spun at a mill in Kinross. “We chose to work with this company particularly for their impressive selection of vibrant colours. The yarns have a very subtle melange, the slightest variations in colour, which is typical of yarns produced by the traditional wool brokers of the Northern and Western Isles.”

Hilary Grant | ‍Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Photo: Future Positive Studio

Hilary Grant is a knitwear design studio, based on Orkney, an archipelago of islands off the North coast of Scotland. Their collections of knitwear and interior accessories are designed and developed using a combination of digital processes and hand sketching and sampling on a domestic knitting machine.

Working with a small knitwear manufacturer in the Scottish Borders, every piece is knitted on a Shima Seiki digital machine before being finished by hand – a process that involves casting off, and washing the knitwear to enhance the handle before a final press.

Hilary Grant | ‍Photo: Stuart McClay
Photo: Stuart McClay

With a focus on pattern making, over stitch or texture, Hilary Grant are interested in knitting traditions from Scotland and its neighbouring Nordic countries and cultures “Our aim is to develop the language of this kind of pattern making, instead of re-appropriating motifs”. Rhythm and mirroring and various techniques in colour theory are explored and developed, working from the stitch up to a design pattern that can only exist in the pixellated form of a knitted structure.

Hilary Grant knitwear can be found in independent shops and galleries around the world – across the UK and as far as Japan, Hong Kong and the US.

Hilary Grant | ‍Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Photo: Future Positive Studio
Hilary Grant | ‍Photo: Future Positive Studio
Photo: Future Positive Studio

Tom Pigeon

Totem 006

Inspired by the colours of summer, Totem 006 by Tom Pigeon is an exclusive neckpiece designed for Local Heroes. Tomato red resin sits beside bright brass and clean white marble Corian; crisp glass-effect acrylic and mint cotton cord – a playful combination of textures, materials, and shapes.

Designed, crafted and assembled in Scotland, Totem 006 is described by its designers as “a modern souvenir; a bold celebration of our skills, our environment, and of the craftspeople and makers that surround us.”

Photo: Future Positive Studio

Totem is part of a collection of playful Post-Modern jewellery inspired by the wit and humour of the Memphis movement of the early 1980s including the technicolor furniture and objects of designers Ettore Sottsass and Nathalie du Pasquier.

Tom Pigeon founder and designer Kirsty Thomas describes her approach “inspired by the Memphis mix of colour, form, pattern and texture we wanted to create jewellery that not only plays with materials but also allows you to play with your jewellery. Totem allows the wearer to change the look and rhythm of the necklace as they are wearing it. Wearing a Totem shouldn’t be a serious fashion statement – it should be fun!”

Tom Pigeon | Future Positive Studio
Photo: Future Positive Studio
Tom Pigeon | Future Positive Studio
Photo: Future Positive Studio

The designers like to take materials out of their common environments and give them new meaning. Kirsty explains, “We use Formica laminate in our signature Form collection and for Totem we initially collaborated with Finnish solid surfacing brand Durat and later with Corian to create the focal blocks for each neckpiece. Each block is then mixed with materials like brass and copper, acrylic, cotton, wood and resin to create a tactile jewellery piece.”

Like all of their jewellery, each Totem is made in the Tom Pigeon studio by “an amazing team of jewellers — anything we can’t do here, we source locally. The acrylic is laser cut in a workshop in the hills above our studio, the Durat and Corian are cut and drilled by a good friend and talented cabinet maker on the other side of the River Tay, and everything else we do ourselves.”

Tom Pigeon | Future Positive Studio
Photo: Future Positive Studio
Tom Pigeon | Future Positive Studio
Photo: Future Positive Studio

These post-modern playthings combine a palette of mixed materials to create a striking necklace that can be worn assembled or deconstructed.

Totem 006 comes in white marble Corian, tomato red and mint. This piece features a polished brass tube, solid Corian block, bespoke discs of glass effect and white acrylic and a red resin ball. The necklace has an adjustable waxed cotton cord with solid brass detail.

Tom Pigeon | Future Positive Studio
‍Photo: Future Positive Studio

Tom Pigeon is a creative studio that designs prints, jewellery and stationery and is run by husband and wife, Pete and Kirsty Thomas. Working with design stores and gallery spaces around the world, the designers create exclusive designs for places like the V&A, Tate Modern and the Barbican. “We’re inspired by shape, colour, pattern and form in nature and the built environment. Our work is simple, crafted and affordable, and made with care to be enjoyed.”

Laura Spring

Arrow Travel Pouch

Local Heroes commissioned textile designer and maker Laura Spring to design a travel themed product that would highlight her trademark love for colour, print, pattern and process. The result is the Arrow Travel Pouch, a screen printed cotton cosmetics bag with a hand-stamped leather zip puller and waterproof lining.

Laura’s design is a stylish way to carry your favourite travel essentials from place to place with ease and is available in two complementary colourways. “This commission allowed me revisit a pouch I designed a couple of years ago that has since morphed into a wristlet pouch in my existing collection. Whilst recently traveling through security at an airport with a wristlet pouch in my bag I realised it was the perfect size to carry the clear plastic bag of liquid and gels that so many of us use at the airport. So for this exhibition I have taken the wristlet back to it’s original form but added a waterproof lining and the hand-stamped leather pullers I add to most of my accessories.”

Laura Spring Arrow Travel Pouch | Photo: Stuart McClay
Photo: Stuart McClay

Accessories are at the heart of Laura’s successful business which has seen her collaborate with artists, designers and companies across various fields. With Laura Aldridge and Ciara Phillips she produced limited edition ranges of bags for House of Voltaire in 2012 and 2014 respectively, and she has also produced editions for Heal’s, Lush Cosmetics, Belle & Sebastian, The National Trust for Scotland, and Not Another Bill.

“The arrow print, initially designed as a print in my weather series, seemed like a playful fit for an airport consumer with everyone rushing in many directions. In order to add to the exclusivity of the product for Local Heroes, it is offered in a fresh coral colourway as well as the popular blue colour seen in my current collection.”

Laura Spring | Photo: Future Positive Studio
Photo: Future Positive Studio
Laura Spring - Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Photo: Future Positive Studio

Laura Spring - Photo: Future Positive Studio

Always looking for the perfect pouch, bag or purse to accommodate particular items, Laura describes how her ‘obsession’ is the reason for founding her design company in 2011. “I thought it would be interesting to design a series of prints that related to the function of the object they were intended for – in that particular case back then it was a suitcase. I wanted a suitcase that was intended for a wet weather trip, a warm weather trip or a windy weather trip so a trio of prints were created and applied to a 1970’s style canvas suitcase I made and my first collection began…”

While ideas and products have developed, changed and broadened since then, bold prints combined with vibrant colours are at the heart of her business combined with the aim of creating functional and beautiful consumer goods in an ethical and sustainable fashion. Working with local manufacturers is important to Laura and the business she is building with all products made within the UK and the majority made within a 20 mile radius of her Glasgow studio.

Laura Spring | Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Photo: Future Positive Studio
Laura Spring | Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Photo: Future Positive Studio

Originally from Staffordshire, Laura lives and works in Glasgow where she creates bold graphic print designs that are transformed through screen and digital print into fashion accessories, homeware and stationery. A graduate of Glasgow School of Art, she was awarded a BA in graphic design in 2002.

With “an enormous love for colour, print, pattern and process”, Laura aims to create products and designs based around these ideals. Bold patterns mixed with bright colours transformed into beautifully crafted products underpin Laura’s work. Inspiration changes from collection to collection but past work has centred around the relationship between motif and function and most recently, Nature’s Camouflage.

Laura Spring | Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Photo: Future Positive Studio

“I am committed to supporting local manufacturing and ethical methods of production in the creation of my work. All trims, finishes and supplies are sourced within the UK where possible and when materials are required to be sourced from abroad, I ensure these are fair-trade. The majority of my collection is, however, made a few miles down the road from my studio by a small family-owned company who have over 35 years experience in the manufacturing industry.”

Laura Spring | Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Photo: Future Positive Studio

Laura has just completed the third phase of an exciting project called India Street, curated by Katy West. This took Laura and three other Scottish-based designers on a two-week research trip to India in February 2015 to develop designs and prototypes for the next phase of the project inspired by the Turkey Red Archive in Edinburgh’s National Museum. This launched at Tramway in Glasgow in June 2016.

Laura exhibits at trade shows regularly both here in the UK and internationally and has her work stocked in a selection of shops and galleries throughout the world.

Instrmnt

Instrmnt 01-D x RISOTTO

Instrmnt, a design studio founded by Pete Sunderland and Ross Baynham, present a special edition of their minimalist watch presented in bespoke risograph packaging. Inspired by the way our belongings are often reassembled while in transit, Instrmnt collaborated with RISOTTO studio to imagine the contents of their Instrmnt 01-D through the eyes of the airport x-ray machine.

Instrmnt | ‍Photo: Future Positive Studio
Photo: Future Positive Studio
Instrmnt | ‍Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Photo: Future Positive Studio

Instrmnt 01-D x RISOTTO features pared-down design with brushed black casing, black face, and high quality black leather strap. In direct contrast with the monochrome watch within, the colourful riso print corresponds to the materials an x-ray machine picks up and how they are shown: blue – metal, orange – biological, and green – plastics & alloys.

The illustrated packaging was produced and printed in Glasgow by RISOTTO while the watch was created by Instrmnt – two studios that have distinct, discordant styles. The graphics featured on the packaging are playful, anarchic, stylised forms; a sharp contrast to the regimented and minimal interior of the box, and the subdued colour scheme of the watch.

‍Photo: Future Positive Studio
Instrmnt | ‍Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Photo: Future Positive Studio

Sunderland and Baynham say their focus lies in creating “considered, user-led products for everyday use.” They launched in 2014 with Instrmnt 01, a minimalist quartz watch that takes inspiration from the industrial design of the mid-20th century. “We have a keen interest in the functional, utilitarian products and tools produced during that time period: from the simple, readable dials of analog ammeters and voltmeters to the revolutionary minimalism of Dieter Rams.”

Instrmnt | ‍Photo: Future Positive Studio
Photo: Future Positive Studio
Instrmnt | ‍Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Photo: Future Positive Studio

Trakke

Fingal and Assynt 12

For Local Heroes, Trakke designed and produced the Fingal and Assynt 12 – two new backpacks in bright blue waxed cotton fabric. Based in Glasgow, Trakke is known for designing equipment that is durable, versatile and uses time-tested materials and components to create bags that thrive out in the wild – equipment that blurs the line between kit and companion.

Trakke | Photo: Stuart McClay
Photo: Stuart McClay
Trakke | Photo: Stuart McClay
‍Photo: Stuart McClay

“For us, a backpack is the perfect souvenir – originating in Scotland, it serves as a reminder, but it’s also a statement of intent – the intent to travel, explore and experience the world. It marks the start of a bigger adventure.” Says founder and designer Alec Farmer.

Trakke | Photo: Stuart McClay
‍Photo: Stuart McClay
Trakke | Photo: Future Positive Studio
Photo: Future Positive Studio

Alec describes how the Fingal backpack is designed for urban explorers; “with a minimal aesthetic and discreet detailing, it’s designed to traverse the urban landscape with ease, whatever the weather. The generous zip closure provides easy access to all your gear and the subtle front pocket is ideal for stowing your daily essentials while you’re on the move.”

Trakke | Photo: Stuart McClay
Photo: Stuart McClay

Inspired by classic mountaineering equipment, the Assynt 12 is a backpack built for any adventure. With a minimal design and modular functionality, it’s adaptable to any environment – from the meeting room to a mountain bothy. “The Assynt 12 is designed for day-long adventures. We’ve stripped it back to the bare essentials, making it light, compact and versatile. Made from Scottish waxed cotton, it’s built to withstand the worst of the weather, and with our signature stainless steel hardware, it’s a bag you can rely on every single day.”

Trakke | Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Photo: Future Positive Studio
Trakke | Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Photo: Future Positive Studio

Rebecca Torres

Axis Swimsuit

Glasgow based designer Rebecca Torres was commissioned by Local Heroes to create a unique souvenir that celebrated design and travel. Her limited-edition one shoulder swimsuit is titled Axis. The upper section features intersecting brightly coloured triangles overlaid onto cornflower blue fabric while the lower section is a vivid solid yellow, the swimsuit is finished with a side panel of black mesh.

“With my brand taking a new leap into swimwear the souvenir concept for Local Heroes worked perfectly. It encourages people to purchase something unexpected. Those returning home after a visit to Scotland can take hold of this item and always be reminded of their time here while residents leaving Scotland for summer sun can be proud to own a piece from a local designer.”

Rebecca Torres Axis Swimsuit

Rebecca Torres is the founder and designer behind her self-titled label. Specialising in the use of luxurious sports led fabrics Rebecca is renowned for her ability to accentuate and empower the female form creating garments featuring enhanced fit, stretch and comfort. “As a designer I have always been interested by how fabric can alter a person’s perception. The potential, on a daily basis, for people to re-invent themselves and by association their outlook on the world.”

Rebecca Torres | Photo: Future Positive Studio
Photo: Future Positive Studio
Rebecca Torres | Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Photo: Future Positive Studio

Nominated as one of Vice magazine’s ‘Creative 30’, shortlisting 30 of the most creative talents under 30 in the UK, Torres also receives praise from fashion icons such as Vogue and has enjoyed a sell out collection on ASOS. The designer has created ranges for many high street retailers and has produced pieces for some of the UK’s top stylists and artists.

Rebecca Torres | Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Photo: Future Positive Studio
Rebecca Torres | Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Photo: Future Positive Studio

Torres is part of Fashion Foundry, an incubator and talent hub for fashion and textile designers in Scotland. Led by the Cultural Enterprise Office in association with Wasps Studios, Fashion Foundry is building a community for Scottish fashion designers and associated creative businesses through a programme of practical workshops, advice, bespoke mentoring and offers access to sampling and sewing facilities.

Warriors Studio

Nummer Wans

Local Heroes commissioned Warriors Studio to design a contemporary interpretation of a classic souvenir poster. Nummer Wans is a way to say ‘number ones’ in west coast Scottish dialect, the poster champions Scottish inventions, discoveries, innovation and design.

The studio’s founders, James Gilchrist and Beth Wilson worked together to celebrate something unique to Scotland “aside from the rolling hills, friendly people and volatile weather”. Their design responds to VisitScotland’s key message about the Year of Innovation, Architecture and Design 2016.

“Scotland has been changing the world as we know it for centuries, one innovation at a time. From the wheels on your car and the tarmac they drive on, to the telephone, television and much more – all this was possible thanks to Scottish ingenuity.” – VisitScotland

Warriors Studio | Photo: Future Positive Studio
Photo: Future Positive Studio

James and Beth chose their ‘nummer wans’ carefully, “Included in the poster are things we found interesting, inspiring, surprising or humorous. We are proud of all of them, from square sausage to sulfuric acid. Although we couldn’t justify Susan Boyle as an invention, a discovery, innovation or design, she is in our hearts and minds.”

“As the work we do is predominantly service-based, what made the Local Heroes commission interesting for us was the opportunity to retain an element of our own personal taste.” Conventionally Warriors Studio design posters promoting events, brands, companies and products, so creating a poster which is essentially a piece of artwork was a challenge. “We recognised that it was essential to design something which people would be genuinely interested in, could personally connect with and would consider aesthetically pleasing which also represented Scotland’s Year of Innovation, Architecture and Design.”

Warriors Studio | Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Photo: Future Positive Studio
Warriors Studio | Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Photo: Future Positive Studio

Describing the design process the designers said, “We’re big fans of independent Swiss type foundry, Grilli Type, so we set the ‘nummer wans’ in GT Haptik, a monolinear geometric grotesque typeface, then combined GT Haptik, with the ‘1’ from Benoît Bodhuin’s ZIGZAG, an experimental and playful font to juxtapose the two lettering styles.”  

“Within our work we often combine cleanliness and structure with playfulness and chaos, which you can see in the friction between the rigid, almost architectural typographic layout and free ‘dancing’ number one to reflect the variety in content. We are proud of Scotland’s nummer wans and we hope you are too!”

Warriors Studio | Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Photo: Future Positive Studio

Warriors Studio is a graphic and communication design agency  working with companies, organisations and individuals across the cultural, private and public sectors. The studio works locally and internationally with clients including Warner Music, Urban Outfitters, ICON Magazine, TEDx and the British Council. Their work has been featured by STV News, It’s Nice That, Creative Review, Grafik, Computer Arts, The Drum, ICON Magazine, Étapes and  the  American Institute for Graphic Arts.

Warriors Studio | Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Photo: Future Positive Studio
Warriors Studio | Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Photo: Future Positive Studio

The studio was founded by James Gilchrist and Beth Wilson through a shared passion for powerful communication and design and was most recently joined by Victoria Donnelly, an Edinburgh College of Art graduate, who brings fresh ideas and colourful shirts to the mix.

In 2014, Warriors also founded Graphic Design Festival Scotland, an international programme of events, which they run annually. Graphic Design Festival Scotland is the largest event ever hosted at Scotland’s National Centre for Design and Architecture, The Lighthouse and Gilchrist and Wilson proudly represent Scotland through a global co-operative at the International Centre of Graphic Design.

Gabriella Marcella

Tropical Beach Towels

Glasgow based designer, Gabriella Marcella, founder and director of RISOTTO, was commissioned to design and produce a set of tropical beach towels. Each is intended to be a vibrant poolside companion: there are three exclusive designs to choose from that will add a distinctive touch to your beach presence.

Gabriella Marcella Tropical Beach Towel detail | Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Gabriella Marcella | Photo: Future Positive Studio

Gabriella agrees that souvenirs are an interesting phenomenon saying “They often carry a certain nostalgic quality and kitschiness that’s specific to a time, place, or event. The driving force to buy a souvenir is often that you can only get it in that place and time and so it serves as a reminder.”

Gabriella Marcella in the studio | Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Gabriella Marcella | Photo: Future Positive Studio

Gabriella’s commission has evolved the traditional idea of a small — and often mass-produced memento into an alternative souvenir. With her beach towels she aims to bring the souvenir to “an authentic and local design market, subverting the object, and giving it a new optimism.”

Gabriella Marcella in the studio | Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Gabriella Marcella | Photo: Future Positive Studio
Gabriella Marcella Riso prints | Photo: Future Positive Studio
Gabriella Marcella | Photo: Future Positive Studio

The RISOTTO house style is notoriously bold and playful and can be seen across the limited edition products that emerge seasonally through the studio; from pick’n’mix stationery sets, to graphic tees and geometric art prints, all bursting with vibrant colour and pattern.

Gabriella Marcella in the studio | Photo: Future Positive Studio
‍Gabriella Marcella | Photo: Future Positive Studio

As the leading risograph specialist in Scotland, RISOTTO works across bespoke stationery, print promotion, publications and artists editions. The studio regularly facilitates print for leading arts organisations, bands and brands, including Dr Martens and Franz Ferdinand.

Gabriella Marcella in the studio | Photo: Future Positive Studio
Gabriella Marcella | Photo: Future Positive Studio

The Glasgow based print studio and stationery company led by Gabriella has an ever expanding online shop whose products are shipped worldwide. Their in-house production allows craftsmanship to be celebrated along with their love for detail; building an environmentally conscious, community-focused business along the way.

In August 2016 Local Heroes presented a major exhibition of newly commissioned Scottish design souvenirs at Edinburgh Airport. A key part of Scotland’s Year of Innovation, Architecture and Design, Local Heroes presented contemporary design to a global audience spanning 120 different locations and three continents. Our exhibition was seen by over 0.5 million people and covered extensively by national and international press including Vogue, The Skinny, BBC, We Heart, Design Week, The Future Laboratory, and The List.

We commissioned some of Scotland’s most interesting and successful designers to create exclusive products for Local Heroes 2016 which you can view below along with films about each designer. This work collectively represents a striking period of contemporary design in Scotland characterised by a renewed confidence and optimism. Local Heroes leaves behind stereotypes about the Scottish design aesthetic and emphasises the modern approach of contemporary designers who embrace bright colour, dynamic pattern and innovative techniques and materials.

The exhibition and shop featured designers based in Scotland whose work exemplifies outstanding quality, originality and design thinking. A special public programme of design events was produced in partnership with Creative Dundee and Creative Edinburgh.

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